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PureGrainAudio’s THROWBACK THURSDAY: Emo Edition Featuring DASHBOARD CONFESSIONAL, MORRISSEY and FALL OUT BOY

- Nov 15, 2018 at 05:07PM
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Yep, it’s grey outside and it’s that sad time between Halloween, before American Thanksgiving and Christmas, where we have nothing to live for. Yep, we done gone EMO (insert sad emoji here)! Wait, but there’s hope! Or is there? No idea, but either way this week we’ve included our modern day Emo knight, Chris Carrabba, some Morrissey and Fall Out Boy in our emo edition of Throwback Thursday. So, whip out that black eyeliner, do the side swept bangs thing, get yourselves some wristbands, and hate the world with all your heat.

01. Dashboard Confessional - “Hands Down” (Live)
- Hailed as the “Messiah of Emo” back in ‘99, Christopher Andrew “Ender” Carrabba, formed the outfit Dashboard Confessional. Back in the day, when MySpace was up-and-coming, this was the only way to keep up-to-date with the Lords of Emo. In 2003, Dashboard Confessional released “A Mark. A Mission, a Brand, a Scar” off…you know it VAGRANT records. Although the lead single was “Screaming Infidelities”, “Hands Down” quickly became the staple track off the album peaking at number 8 on Billboard’s Alt Songs Chart, in-turn, making this DCs first top-ten hit.


02. Morrissey - “The More You Ignore Me, The Closer I Get”
- If you can’t appreciate Morrissey for his dark sense of humor and satire, then we can’t be friends. “The More You Ignore Me, the Closer I Get” was the only song to become a hit overseas in America landing at numero 46 on Billboards Hot 100. It did, however, top the Modern Rock Tracks. Perhaps Steven Morrissey is the Godfather or Emo?


03. Fall Out Boy - “Of All The Gin Joints In All The World”
- O Fall Out Boy, o Fall Out Boy, wherefore art thou, Fall Out Boy? Over Hizzle, in the chronicles of Emo. Right at the peak of MySpace and pop/rock becoming its own genre, Fall Out Boy arrived on the scene in 2001 categorized as hard-core punk. Hailing from Chicago, this quartet, spearheaded by bassist and main lyricist Pete Wentz, this track is a reference to a quote by Humphrey Bogart in Casablanca (1942). The whole album is catchy and infectious, and the song titles are probably the best to come from the band.

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